Archive | January 2020

#HikeYourOwnHike

#HikeYourOwnHike has been floating out there in the world lately.  It is meant to be a reminder to not compare yourself to others, and to not minimize yourself or your accomplishments based on what others can do or their opinions of you.

I was asked the other day when I started hiking and it got me thinking.  I mean, I went on little hikes when I was a kid, and have walked the trails in my woody Pacific Northwest city my whole life.  But when did I start really hiking?

I would say it was when I was dating my ex, in that period before I got married.  We started locally, and then did more on trips, when we visited National Parks.  It just kind of went from there, and pretty soon, I was a hiker.  According to the ex though, I was too slow.  He didn’t hike with me; he hiked ahead of me.  He complained that I didn’t keep up, and he just couldn’t be bothered with that…  He would wait for me somewhere up ahead.  The hike was a competitive thing for him, and I couldn’t compete at his level.  He made me feel that I would never be up to doing a long hike, or a really strenuous hike.  That I wasn’t enough.  Of course, that’s nonsense.

I kept hiking after we split.  Since that time I have done far more than I ever did with him.  I have hiked 10-12 miles at high elevation, with thousands of feet of elevation gain.  I have hiked all over the country.  I have hiked with friends.  I have hiked alone.  I have hiked in bear country with bear spray and bells.  I have hiked in rattlesnake country.  I have hiked in hot weather and cold.  I have hiked in the rain, and on snowshoes.  I’m not the fastest hiker.  I certainly haven’t been in the last year, when I was struggling through some pretty significant pain.  But who cares if I’m fast?  It isn’t a race.  It isn’t a competition.

For me, hiking is about seeing nature, standing at the viewpoint, taking way too many pictures, and spending time with friends.  It is about clearing my head, and smelling the mountain air.  It is about cracking open that can of wine at the glacial lake at the top, sucking in my breath as I wade into the freezing cold water, skipping rocks at the beach and watching the sun lower over the horizon.  It isn’t about miles, or elevation gain, or speed, or remoteness, although those are sometimes factors in the best rewards.

If you put one foot in front of another on a trail, you are a hiker.  Don’t let anyone else tell you that your version isn’t good enough.  Figure out what speaks to you and makes you happy, and don’t worry about what anyone else thinks.  Find people who are on the same page, but if you don’t have that, go anyway.  Life is too short and too complicated to burden yourself with comparisons.  You do you.  #HikeYourOwnHike

 

 

 

Milestones…

You guys!  I did a thing!  I did two things!

I reached some milestones this week.  It has now been a month since my surgery, and on Wednesday for the first time since before surgery, I was back up to my daily walking goal – 11,000 steps!  Since then I have hit my 11,000 steps for three days in a row!

It feels good to be getting my stamina back.  I’m able to walk longer distances without feeling a lot of discomfort later.  Pretty soon I’ll be ready to tackle some hills!

I also reached another milestone on Wednesday…  I wore pants!  Like actual real jeans with buttons; not yoga pants or leggings!  I only wore them for a couple of hours, and they were kinda stretchy, but I’m still calling that progress.  My incision is healing, and while my belly still feels pretty numb, I can definitely feel an improvement.

Pants and 11,000 steps – I’m rocking my week!  How about you?  What were your accomplishments this week?

 

Astoria Weekend: Lewis and Clark!

Day 2, Saturday, May 25, 2019

Astoria, Oregon

After visiting Seaside, we decided to head over to the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park.  I have visited before, but Jeff and the kids had never been there.

Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Discovery spent the winter 1805-1806 here in this approximate location; they named their camp Fort Clatsop.  When the expedition left the West Coast in the spring of 1806, they gave Fort Clatsop’s structures to the local Native Americans and the fort was eventually reclaimed by nature. A replica was built when the site was designated as a National Historical Park in 1958, but sadly it burned in 2006; a replacement was built in 2007. The replica is thought to be historically accurate, having been built from sketches and descriptions that Lewis drew in his journals.

We checked out the museum in the Visitor’s Center, with its artifacts.  Beaver hats and pelts, a Coastal tribe canoe, grasses and foods that the Native Americans in the area used, as well as historic muskets and examples of clothing that the expedition members would have worn.  It is always interesting to revisit a place.  We also checked out Fort Clatsop, and the kids enjoyed exploring it.  There wasn’t much space for 30 people to spend a cold, rainy winter!  Jeff and I enjoyed wandering and following after the kids, relaxing and reading the signs.

The kids did the Junior Ranger program and got their badges; just in the nick of time too, because it started raining pretty hard!  I didn’t really take many photos since I had visited there before, and apparently I was more into taking selfies!  For more about the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park, see my previous post.

That afternoon we went to the Fort George Brewery for pizza and some beer; while we were waiting for a table we checked out some of the nearby shops in downtown Astoria.  The pizza was delicious, and everybody was happy!  Jeff and I tried a couple different beers, it was nice to do some sampling and see what we liked.

Nearby to Fort George Brewery is the Reveille Ciderworks; one day I’ll visit there and try their ciders!  It just wasn’t in the cards that day because the kids were more interested in pizza than some of the “weird food” they have at food trucks.  Traveling with kids is a change of scenery for me!  That said, I was still able to get a couple of oyster shooters at Fort George – nobody else wanted any – it was so strange because they are so delicious!

 

 

Astoria Weekend: Carousels and Fishes

Day 1 & 2, Friday & Saturday, May 24 & 25, 2019

For Memorial Day weekend, Jeff and I had an opportunity to meet in Astoria for the long weekend. It was so much fun!

I left work a little early and drove down to Oregon in heavy, agonizing traffic. Blech. I was expecting it, since it was Memorial Day Weekend, but that part was not fun…  I got there about 7:30 and Jeff and the kids were already there, even though they had to drive more miles. There’s a benefit to not having to drive through Seattle! I was excited to see them, so I quickly forgot about the long drive. That evening was pretty quiet; we drove around Astoria a little bit to get our bearings before dark.  I have been there before, but Jeff never had.  After dark, we got some snacks and had a relaxing evening in the hotel room, catching up.

On Saturday morning we decided to start our day in Seaside, a touristy little beach town on the Oregon Coast about 20 miles south of Astoria. With kids in tow, we made our way to Pig N’ Pancake – a kind of themey IHOP type place that kids love, because of course, they have lots of kid friendly meals. They also have adult friendly meals, including a Kielbasa skillet and a Taco omelette, in addition all sorts of pancakes, crepes and blintzes! Something for everyone and our server was friendly and attentive.

Me and Jeff with Lewis and Clark

We wandered through downtown Seaside, and saw the historic carousel parked within an odd mall type structure, packed to the gills with touristy shops. We did find t-shirts and sweatshirts for reasonable prices to remember our visit. We saw a man making giant bubbles outside so that kids could play in them, and so parents could buy the kids their own giant bubble wand and bubble recipe. The kids ran through the bubbles for a while, but we didn’t buy the wand.

Right on the beach is the Seaside Aquarium, a small aquarium with over 100 species of fish and marine animals.  Interestingly, this little place is one of the oldest aquariums on the West Coast, in operation since 1937.  The building that houses the aquarium was originally built as a natatorium (that’s a fancy word for a building that houses a swimming pool), and piped water in from the ocean just steps away and then heated it.  The pool went belly up during the Great Depression and the aquarium took over the building.

The Seaside Aquarium is small and no frills.  You won’t find fancy staff demonstrations or huge, involved habitats, and large pavilions.  You will see small tanks, a touch tank and basic laminated cards with information about the animals who live there.  And you will find the seals.  The aquarium has eleven harbor seals who live there.  They have a tank right up front and visitors can feed the seals fish purchased there, but be careful!  These seals have learned that the best way to get some treats is to get your attention, and they will stop at nothing.  Each seal has its own schtick, including water slaps, belly slaps, twirls, jumps, squeals and even splashing the visitors!  Each seal has their own method, and apparently they are all self-taught and have not been formally trained.

The aquarium has bred these seals in captivity and was the first to successfully breed harbor seals; some of them are fifth or sixth generation!  The Seaside Aquarium also hold the record for the oldest harbor seal in the world; Clara died in 1979 at the age of 35.

The aquarium also has a tsunami fish; the last surviving specimen of five striped beakfish that lived for more than two years in the partially submerged hull of the Japanese boat Sai-shou-maru , after the boat went adrift during the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami.  The boat washed onshore at Long Beach, Washington on March 22, 2013, after traveling more than two years and 4,000 miles from Japan. They could not release the beakfish in northwest waters, due to the threat of it becoming invasive so far from it’s native habitat; it is now on display here.

It was an interesting visit and didn’t take long.  We checked out the tanks, fed the seals and managed to not get too wet!

 

Puzzle Thoughts

Last weekend at the cabin, I spent a lot of time working on a puzzle.  I was able to finish it that weekend with help from Lelani and Laura.  It got me thinking about perspective.  When you are working on a puzzle, sometimes you just need to step away from it for a bit, or look at it from a different angle.  Move around to the other side.  Don’t give up; just keep trying, but take a break before getting back to it.  It lets you see something you couldn’t see before.

I think my puzzle perspective is applicable in career and life too.  I have a few things going on in my life that require patience, and not knowing, and having faith that things will work out for the best.  I’ll have to take my own advice, sit back and get a new perspective.

It’s been four weeks since my surgery, and thankfully last week’s snow is gone so I can get out of the house!  I’m not ordinarily bothered by walking if there is snow, but snow, ice and my big hill combined were a bit more than I could manage while I’m still healing.  Good thing I was able to work from home!  I did head out for some short excursions to the bottom of the hill, and definitely felt it on the way back up!

I still get tired if I exert myself too much, so I’m working on stamina.  Besides that, it just bothers me when my clothes rub on my incision.  Which is pretty much constant, but mostly just an annoyance.  I’m still not supposed to lift more than 15 pounds…  I can’t carry tubs of yard debris, so I have to make a lot of little trips.  No pushing wheelbarrows…  No vacuuming or raking…  No lifting bags of horse feed…  No core exercises…  Healing seems to be a lot of don’ts…  I can’t wait until I get cleared to do my regular routine!

Healing clearly gives me a lot of time to think!

 

Circus Trip 2018: Abraham Lincoln Birthplace NHP

Day 31, Wednesday, August 15, 2018

Hodgenville, Kentucky

I have for so long wanted to visit the site where our sixteenth President, Abraham Lincoln was born.  I have seen where he was a young man, where he was a lawyer, where he was President, and where he died…  It was so humbling to stand at the place where this great man began his life!

Sign Posing!

Lincoln was born here at Sinking Spring Farm (named for the water source) on February 12, 1809; he lived here for the first two years of his life.  His parents, Thomas and Nancy Hanks Lincoln made their living as farmers, and contrary to the usual story, Lincoln didn’t grow up particularly poor, by the standards of the day.  He did move around a lot though, as the family had to leave Sinking Spring Farm after a dispute about the ownership of the land.  They moved to nearby Knob Creek Farm in 1811, when Lincoln was two years old.

The Lincoln family Bible

The birthplace memorial here was completed in 1911, a few years after the 100th anniversary of Lincoln’s birth.  A huge marble and granite Memorial Building was built between 1909 and 1911, in Greek and Roman architectural styles.  It has 56 steps up to the building, to represent the 56 years that Lincoln was alive. Sixteen windows on the building and sixteen rosettes on the ceiling represent the fact that he was our nation’s 16th President.  Inside, a symbolic birth cabin gives visitors an idea of what the cabin where Lincoln was born might have looked like.

The symbolic birth cabin was moved to the site when the Memorial Building was constructed, and had to be made smaller to fit inside the building, and to more accurately represent what Lincoln’s first home probably looked like.  At the time the Memorial Building was constructed, many people actually believed that this was the cabin where Lincoln was born.  Later technology allowed them to do dendochronology (tree ring analysis) in 2004 to determine that the cabin was not built until the 1840s, so it could not have been Lincoln’s birthplace.

When I first arrived, it had been pouring down rain, so I hurried into the Visitor’s Center and then hurried over to the Memorial Building.  When I went back outside, the sun had come back out!  I went down the 56 steps of the Memorial Building to check out Sinking Spring, the water feature which gave the farm its name.  Sinking Spring is an underground spring, with an outlet to the surface set down into a hole; this was certainly the first water Abraham Lincoln ever drank!

Knob Creek Farm is also part of the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park; it is located ten miles away from Sinking Spring Farm.  Unfortunately, due to budget cuts, this portion of the park was not staffed, so I didn’t get to see inside this cabin.  It was also not original to Lincoln or his family, but belonged to the family of one of the Lincolns’ neighbors.  The young boy who lived in this cabin is thought to have once saved young Abe Lincoln’s life when he fell into Knob Creek.  The cabin was moved here when the historical park was created.  It was peaceful and quiet and interesting to see another place where Lincoln spent time as a child; he lived here from the ages of two to seven.  Another land ownership dispute caused the family’s move to Indiana.

There were several signs posted indicating that Copperhead snakes make their home in the area.  I didn’t see any, but also didn’t go tromping off through the field to the creek!

After leaving Lincoln behind for the day, I made my way to Lexington, Kentucky, where I would be stopping for the night.  I saw a highway sign advertising Wildside Winery and decided to check it out!  They had good wines, and a nice selection of both dry and sweet wines.  I enjoyed talking with my server – it was his first day working at the winery – but he had lived in Brookings, Oregon for eight years, so we had the Pacific Northwest in common!  I purchased four bottles; one was their Wild Duet.  Sadly, they are all long gone now – but they were delicious!

That evening I camped at Boonesboro State Park in Lexington; the first of two nights I would spend there!