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Yellowstone Road Trip 2017: On the Water

Day 12-14, Friday, August 4-6, 2017

I headed out from Portland towards home on Friday morning.  Along the way, I stopped off at the Tacoma Marina to meet my friend David, who had a boat moored there.  We had talked about just meeting for lunch, but the timing turned out well, as my only commitment was getting back to work the next Monday.  The weather was spectacular, so we ended up taking the boat out for a couple of days of relaxation and decompressing.

On our way

 

Our getaway

The good thing about a boat on the water is that you are a captive to the concept of relaxing.  We anchored off of Vashon Island and had almost no interruptions, except for the occasional boat going by.  For two days, I read my book, napped on the bow of the boat, sunned myself, fished and crabbed (both rather unsuccessfully, as an octopus kept stealing the bait from the crab pots), ate, drank red wine (Redhead Red blend – yummy!), and swam in the Sound.  It was glorious!  We ate well, with shish-ka bobs, strawberries, peaches, plums, assorted snacks, and Greek yogurt for breakfast.  Corn on the cob and roasted potatoes were salted with sea water and cooked on the BBQ.

We jumped in the water whenever we got too hot, and bobbed on pool noodles and watched the jellyfish float by, drinking canned beer until we got too cold.  Well, let’s get real, I always got too cold first.  I learned that full beer cans float – I have no idea how I made it into my 40s while living right next door to the ocean without knowing this.  The weekend cycle – get hot, jump in, bob, drink beer, climb out, warm up on the bow, repeat.

Jellyfish floating by

David knows I hate Modest Mouse – so every time Modest Mouse came on the Spotify station, he would skip over the song, even if it meant getting up to do it.  Bless his sweet heart.  We talked about life; all those deep conversations that happen with close quarters, people you cherish, and wine after dark.

The sunset from the water

These were some of the most peaceful, enjoyable days I have experienced in a long time, and the perfect end to a great vacation.

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Yellowstone Road Trip 2017: Dee Wright Observatory and Balancing Rocks

Day 11, Thursday, August 3, 2017

We didn’t have a need to get up really early this morning, so I took a brief walk, had breakfast, and hit the pool. It was so hot out that it was already warm enough for swimming!  I loved spending some more time in the pool!

Me at the Pool

Once we got going, we headed out and went to the Dee Wright Observatory.  It is an observation structure at the summit of McKenzie Pass in the Cascade Mountains near Sisters.  The road up to the summit of McKenzie pass is the route of an 1860 wagon route on the Oregon Trail.  The pioneers actually had to build the road in order to get the wagons across the lava – and you think your commute is bad!

The road leading to Dee Wright

The observatory is a 5,187 feet in elevation, and offers panoramic views of the nearby mountains.  The area around the observatory consists of 65 square miles of black lava rock.  It was built in 1935 by the Civilian Conservation Corps, and was named for the foreman of the project to build the observatory, who died before the project reached its completion.

Dee Wright Observatory

When it is clear, you can see Mount Washington, Mount Jefferson, South, North and Middle Sister, Mount Hood and many more.  Unfortunately, the day we were there, the area was covered in a thick haze of smoke from the wildfires up in Canada.  We could see the closer mountains, but not as well as I would have liked, and the mountains further away were not visible at all. I will have to visit again.

The observatory structure is very cool because it has multiple windows built into the stone structure where you can see the various mountains framed in stone – and they are all labeled so you can tell which mountain you are looking at.  We checked out all the windows, and took photos.

 

We also did the nature trail walk, which explained the volcanic eruptions that occurred in the area, the different types of lava flow and how plants and animals returned to an area after the landscape is changed by volcanic eruptions.  There were small trees and shrubs growing, and there were hundreds of monarch butterflies!

 

After we went to the Dee Wright Observatory, we went into downtown Sisters to get lunch; burgers and fries that were good, but nothing to get all excited about.  We wandered around town for a bit and poked around in some shops before we got on the road for our next destination.

Our next stop was the Oregon Balancing Rocks.  If you hadn’t heard of them, never fear – I hadn’t either.  Apparently, years ago, my brother and sister in law saw a documentary on the Oregon Public Broadcasting Station about the Balancing Rocks.  They visited many years ago, and wanted to see them again with the kids.

The Balancing Rocks in Oregon are similar to the more famous balancing rocks in Arches National Park in Utah.  The harder stone above is held up by softer stone underneath.  The softer stone erodes away more quickly, leaving these mushroom-shaped capped stones.  The Oregon Balancing Rocks are not nearly as exciting as the rocks in Arches though – the colors are more brown than red, and they aren’t nearly as pretty.  There were lizards there though!

I have no idea where these rocks really were, besides about 30 miles north of Sisters down a gravel forest service road, somewhere overlooking Billy Chinook Lake and the Metolius River (how’s that for vague?).  There is an unmarked small gravel parking lot at the trail head, but no services.  The quarter mile trail is well maintained gravel though – and the kids enjoyed running down it with abandon.  Which they probably shouldn’t, because I am sure this area has rattlesnakes – but hey, I’m the aunt…

We checked out the rocks, and checked out the view, which was hazy because of the wildfire smoke, and took some pictures of the lizards, but really, there isn’t a whole lot to see out there in the middle of nowhere.  Like I said, they aren’t as exciting as their more famous cousins in Utah…

 

After the Balancing Rocks, we started the long drive home.  The wildfires made the sun bright red and the sky really hazy.  We even got out of the car for a minute to take photos of the sun because it was so unusual.  We got home to my brother’s house about 8 pm, unpacked the car and discovered a house that was about 87 degrees upstairs – Yikes!  Home sweet home!  The air conditioning and some fans did manage to cool it down to 85 by the time we got into bed – that certainly isn’t much though!

The wildfire sun and haze

Distance for the Day: Sisters, Oregon – Dee Wright Observatory, Sisters, OR – Balancing Rocks, OR – Portland, OR (4 hours, 15 minutes; 185 miles – this is a guess, because Google Maps is being fickle and wouldn’t let me map some of these because the roads are still closed for the winter)
Fees: None
Lodging: Back home at my brother’s house

Yellowstone Road Trip 2017: High Desert Museum

Day 10, Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Today was another long day of driving, so we planned to be heading out at 7.  We actually ended up getting on the road at 7:30, so we didn’t do too bad – after all, we did sort of dawdle at the hotel breakfast for awhile…

And then we drove…  For awhile… Through desert and sagebrush and lots and lots of Eastern Oregon boring…  The monotony was broken up only by a couple of restroom breaks, and a short stop for road construction in the middle of nowhere – so nowhere, I don’t even know where nowhere was…  These are big states out West people…

There isn’t much that’s exciting to say about this 5 hours of mind numbing car sitting, except there was a little incident.  The girls were bickering, so my brother did the classic, “Do you want me to pull this van over?” screeching stop on the side of the highway, releasing a huge plume of gravel dust into the air!  Then we rearranged – my sister in law in the far back with one niece, my other niece in the middle seat, and me up front.  Grounded in a 7 passenger mini van!  I had to try really hard to keep a straight face; sometimes it pays to be the aunt!

Finally, just before 1 pm, we made it to the High Desert Museum.  We had peanut butter wraps for lunch in the parking lot, and then headed inside.  This place is amazing!  My brother and his family knew that of course, since they had been there several times.  The High Desert Museum is part history museum, complete with interactive history exhibits, and part zoo/conservation center.

The High Desert Museum

I checked out the exhibits on World War II, the Native Americans during the period of assimilation in the United States, and a exhibit of really gorgeous Oregon photography! The exhibits are very well done and interactive.  They also have an outdoor area with historic buildings that you can go inside, including a homestead home, a root cellar, a barn and an old sawmill!  They have a couple of train cars as well that are being restored and aren’t on display.

 

We also saw several of the animal shows, including Desert Dwellers, featuring the Desert Tortoise, the American Badger and the Porcupine, a show featuring a Great Horned Owl (he can’t fly due to an injured wing), and a show featuring their River Otters.  They also have animals on exhibit throughout the museum, so you can see them outside of the shows as well.  They have several types of snakes and lizards, a Gila Monster, a Bobcat, and several birds of prey.

 

Note: Photo credit for the Bobcat goes to my Sister in Law.

 

Note: Photo credit for the Barn Owl, Bald Eagles and Golden Eagle goes to my Sister in Law.

After we left the Museum, we went into downtown Sisters, Oregon and had dinner at the Sisters Saloon (they have an all ages section).  I had the Bison Burger and a cider – delicious!  We all enjoyed the kids menu, because it had word searches.  I love word searches, so I enjoyed helping the kids find their words.  Sometimes it is the simple things.

Sisters Saloon

After dinner, we checked into what is known simply as the “Llama Hotel” in my family.  That’s right – the Best Western in Sisters, Oregon has a herd of llamas onsite to captivate and delight guests – my nieces and nephew love it and always ask to stay there, so we did.  Like many Best Westerns, it has a Western theme, and this one also has a nice outdoor pool and covered hot tub.  Of course, we made good use of it!

A doe and her fawn at the Llama Hotel

Perhaps strangely, I did not take any photos of the llamas at the Llama Hotel (don’t judge me!), but I did capture this mama deer nursing her still spotted fawn.

Our evening was capped off by sitting on the deck of my brother’s room, sipping on adult beverages while the kids watched TV inside.  It was fabulous.

Distance for the Day: Nampa, ID – High Desert Museum, Bend, OR – Sisters, OR (5 hours, 43 minutes; 333 miles – you gain an hour coming west with the time change)
High Desert Museum Entrance Fee: $15 per adult, $9 per child (3-12)
Best Western Ponderosa Lodge: Sisters, OR: $210 for my room (includes tax) – free breakfast!  NOTE: Bend and Sisters are incredibly expensive in the summer season!

 

Yellowstone Road Trip 2017: Craters of the Moon NM

Day 9, Tuesday, August 1, 2017

We got up around 6 am and got on the road at about 7:15, since we had a long day ahead of us!  Trying to keep 3 kids quiet while you are packing up tents, brushing teeth, and getting ready to go is tough!  Today was the day we were going to see Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve!  Craters of the Moon NM is a relatively little known monument in kind of the middle of nowhere Idaho.  It is really cool though!

Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve

Craters protects the site of lava fields and lava tubes that were created by previous volcanic eruptions; it compass three major lava fields and about 400 square miles of sagebrush steppe grasslands. The is 53,571 acres in size.  The three lava fields in the monument are along the Great Rift of Idaho, and have open rift cracks, including the deepest rift crack known on Earth.  It is 800 feet deep! There are examples of almost every kind of basaltic lava, as well as tree molds, (where a cavity is left by a lava-incinerated tree), lava tube caves, and many other volcanic features.  Craters is also known for its excellent wildlife habitat, as many animals survive on the sagebrush grasslands.  This post, however, will not contact much wildlife because it was about 95 degrees on the day of our visit!

Pahoehoe Lava and a Cinder Cone

We went out into the lava fields to hike some of the lava tubes – remember to bring a hat, sunscreen and plenty of water – it was really hot the day we were there!  The above ground hike is 1.6 miles, if you walk to the entrances of each of the lava tubes.  You can also go inside!  Remember, if you want to go into the lava tubes, you have to have a free cave permit; just stop by the Visitor’s Center before you head out, and they will give you one, hassle free.

Me at Craters

Our first lava tube was Indian Tunnel – this is a fairly long lava tube, but has sections where the roof of the tube has collapsed, so part of it is exposed to the sky.  It is really cool!  The cooling lava and the later collapses of the roof left huge lava boulders on the floor of the cave, so you have to scramble over them in order to make it through.  The kids loved it, and even the 5 year could easily do it.  There were lots of pigeons in the shady upper reaches, and we found a lot of chipmunk and other rodent bones in the cave as well.  We left them for the next people to enjoy.

 

 

We also hiked into Beauty Cave and Dewdrop Cave.  Dewdrop Cave is the smallest; it is really just a recess back into the ground, but there is a tucked away section that is pretty dark.  Beauty Cave is relatively short, but completely dark (bring a flashlight). Beauty Cave is suitable for most people, as long as you can enter the cave, you will find that the floor of the cave is smooth and easy to walk on; it doesn’t have all the boulders that are present in the other caves.

My niece and nephew climbing into Dewdrop Cave

Boy Scout Cave is the most challenging of the lava tubes.  It requires crawling and squeezing through tight spots; we debated, but ultimately decided to leave Boy Scout Cave for another trip, and settled for a quick peek at its entrance.

 

The entrance to Boy Scout Cave. We passed

After the caves, we planned on a picnic at one of the picnic tables in the shade.  Where we quickly realized why no one else had snagged the shady spot on such a hot day.  As soon as we got out of the van, we were SWARMED by hornets!  And I mean SWARMED – they were everywhere!  It was so bad that my brother got back in the van to drive it away, while the rest of us followed on foot in hopes that we could lose the hornets and not let any of them into the van.  It was crazy!  Our tactic worked, and we did manage to escape without anyone getting stung.  There was a huge meltdown in the van a little bit later after we discovered a small bug that needed to be let out.  No photos of this hornet cyclone – sorry!

The hornet escapade did prevent us from doing another hike that we had planned on, the Devil’s Orchard Nature Trail, because the trail head had some hornets hanging around the cars, and the kids absolutely refused to get out of the car.  I’m not sure I blame them – perhaps the hornets are why it is called Devil’s Orchard.

 

Me again!

Instead we went to see the Spatter Cones.  There are two miniature volcanoes here, and a third called Snow Cone, just a short walk away.  These cones were created when the volcano spewed blobs of hot lava into the air, mounding into the form of a cone about 2,100 years ago.  These spatter cones are mere babies in the life of geology!  Snow Cone was fascinating, because its crater is so narrow and deep that snow from the winter lasts all year long!  We got to peer down into it and see the remaining snow – on the first of August on a 95 degree day!  We also found a chipmunk enjoying the cooler temperatures of the crater.

 

We headed back to the Visitor’s Center and listened to the Ranger Talk on types of lava.  She explained the differences between cinder cones and spatter cones, as well as black lava versus pahoehoe lava (which gets its name from the Hawai’ian lava flows).  She let us hold lava rocks; some are really heavy and others are way lighter, depending on how dense the rock is – it was a great talk, and everybody enjoyed it.  Of course we got Junior Ranger badges too!

Our stop for the night was at a Sleep Inn in Nampa, Idaho.  It was our first hotel of the trip!  We had talked it over and decided that camping in 90+ degree weather just didn’t sound very appealing, and setting up after our long day of driving seemed like a chore too (who knew Idaho was so wide?). The shower was amazing though!

 

Distance for the Day: Victor, ID – Craters of the Moon NM – Nampa, ID (5 hours, 51 minutes; 341 miles)
Craters of the Moon Entrance Fee: $15 per vehicle for 7 days, free with a National Parks Pass
Sleep Inn: Nampa, ID: $107 per room (includes tax) – free breakfast!

Yellowstone Road Trip 2017: Grand Teton NP

Day 8, Monday, July 31, 2017

We got up that morning and packed up camp; we were heading out from Yellowstone today, after having arrived the previous Wednesday and spending 5 nights there camping!  I was ready for departure way earlier than the rest of the family so after I broke down my camp, I went and took a shower, got ice for the cooler, washed the dishes and waited.

Our destination for the day was south and then west.  We actually weren’t sure where we would be stopping for the night!  We stopped by the Canyon Visitor’s Center to get our Junior Ranger booklets checked out and get our badges.  Yep – I did it with the kids!  We all took our oaths, and got our swag – a wooden pin on badge, a sew on patch (mine was a bison, but there is also a bear and a geyser), and a sticker!

 

Badges and Patches and Stickers, Oh My!

On our way south through the Hayden Valley there were actually quite a few bison roaming!  This was a big contrast from the previous day when we had gone through – seeing almost no bison at all!  It just reminds you that it pays to not give up on a place!

 

Bison Herd, Hayden Valley

 

Bison, Hayden Valley

We stopped by Grant Village for sandwiches for lunch and checked out the Visitor’s Center there – I got stamps for my passport!  We learned about the fires in the park at the exhibit too; Yellowstone has had a number of fires over the years, in all areas of the park.  Most seem to be started by lightning, but some are caused by careless humans.

We then headed out of the park, and drove south to Grand Teton National Park.  We stopped at the Colter Bay Visitor’s Center, where the kids enjoyed playing on the edge of the lake.  I liked watching the boats, and seeing the swallows swoop down and skim across the lake catching bugs!

Colter Bay Marina – Grand Teton NP

 

catching bugs at Colter Bay

Our next destination was the Cunningham Cabin.  I had visited in 2016, but I was happy to see it again!  The cabin has an interesting history, complete with horse thieving and shootouts!  You can read about it here – as I detailed the story after my previous visit.  The kids enjoyed it and we all loved seeing the elk that were eating grass in the fields in the distance beyond the cabin.  It was so beautiful with the Teton mountain backdrop!  This area is truly stunning.

We drove down to the Gros Ventre Road, which I had been told was good habitat for moose spotting, but once again there were no moose.  My brother talked to a fisherman though, who said they frequently hung out at the river near the Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center.  We backtracked a bit and checked it out – I was already excited when we spotted a big Bald Eagle on the riverbank, but then we saw a huge Bull Moose!  He was gorgeous!  He lay down in the river right after we got there, so I don’t have any photos of him standing, but wow!  He was an amazing sight!  Everybody was really excited to see him and we watched for a while.  We also saw a couple of Brewer’s Blackbirds perched on a branch in the river, watching for food.

Upon leaving the park, we headed out a small unmarked road to see if we could spot a bit more wildlife, but our sightings were limited to deer, birds and cattle.  It turned out to be Highway 390 – the Moose Wilson Road.  It was fun though – small and curvy, with one lane sections – we saw a couple wildlife tour vehicles heading in the other direction, so it was obviously a good spot usually!

We headed west through Teton Pass and ended up at the Teton Valley RV Resort in Victor, Idaho.  They had a pool, so we had spaghetti for dinner and then went swimming.

Teton Valley RV Resort

We also almost cried when we couldn’t find a corkscrew to open a bottle of wine.  I had accidentally purchased a bottle with a cork instead of a screw cap and we had forgotten to bring a corkscrew!  My two nieces had been fighting after swimming (I think it was an argument about who was wearing whose shirt – important things, you know), and they got grounded to sit alone at separate picnic tables.  There was a lot of pouting and whining, and trying to butter up the adults, so we really needed that wine!  Fortunately, my brother saved the day and was able to get the cork out with his knife.  YAY!  Otherwise I might have been ready to start drinking whisky!

Other than the girls pouting, we had a great evening!  Something about sitting around a picnic table with a lantern and booze soothes the soul.

 

Distance for the Day:  Canyon Campground Yellowstone – Grand Teton National Park – Victor, ID (3 hrs, 52 min; 141 miles)
Fees: Grand Teton Entrance Fee – $30 per vehicle for 7 days, free with a National Parks Pass (our route on the east side of the park kept us out of the area of the park that charges a fee, but if you want to see the West side of the park, including Jenny Lake, you have to pay)
Teton Valley RV Resort, Victor, Idaho: $25 per night for a tent site

Yellowstone Road Trip 2017: Springs and Falls

Day 7, Sunday, July 30, 2017

Sunday was our last full day in Yellowstone, so we tried to see some of the sights that we hadn’t yet made it to.  We started out by driving over the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, which is not far from the Canyon Campground where we were staying.  We stopped for a short hike at the Brink of the Upper Falls – you can hike down to the viewpoint and watch the waterfall cascade over the brink.

The Yellowstone River at the Brink of the Upper Falls

 

Me at the Brink of the Upper Falls

 

Our next stop was Artist Point.  Artist Point is just that – a viewpoint with amazing opportunities for beautiful paintings and photography of the Lower Falls.  Interestingly, its name was a mistake.  F. Jay Haynes, Yellowstone photographer in the 1890s, thought that this was the place where Thomas Moran painted his famous paintings of the Lower Falls in 1872.  It wasn’t – that distinction belongs to Moran Point on the north rim – which is now called Lookout Point.  Despite the confusion – go – it is beautiful!

Me with the Lower Falls

 

Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone

We stopped at the Gibbon Meadows picnic area for lunch.  It is right along the Gibbon River, which quietly meanders along at that point.  The kids played on the banks of the river for a little while we got lunch ready; peanut butter wrap sandwiches.  Super-FANCY!

Next up after lunch was the Midway Geyser Basin; we went to Grand Prismatic Spring.  I had been there the year before with my mom, so it was neat to go again!  I do have to admit that it was pretty nerve-wracking following my nieces and nephew around on that boardwalk crowded with people and the hot, hot, water right there!  It is probably not considered acceptable to have 10, 8 and 5 year olds on leashes?  There is a new trail that leads up to an overlook above Grand Prismatic Spring; it is about a mile long.  We were going to hike up that trail to get a different perspective, but we weren’t able to find it!  Granted, we didn’t look that hard either.  So the overlook above Grand Prismatic Spring remains on the list of things to do next time I am in Yellowstone!

Grand Prismatic Spring

We visited Gibbon Falls; the signs explain that Gibbon Falls in right on the edge of the caldera that was created with the volcanic eruption 640,000 years ago.  If you go south from Gibbon Falls, you travel into the caldera.  If you go north, you move out of the caldera.  Even though you can’t see the caldera, it was interesting to ponder driving through a giant volcanic crater.  I walked down to get a view of the falls, where it promptly started to hail!  Yep, that’s right, it seemed we weren’t going to get away from the terrible rain on this trip!  By the time we got back to the car, all of us were soaked – right down to sloshy shoes.  We all took our shoes and socks off even – except my poor brother, who was driving.

Gibbon Falls

On our drive back to camp, we went up north through the Mammoth Hot Springs and Tower areas of the park once again.  The wildlife spotting was amazing!  In just a short period of time, driving on the road, we saw two Sandhill cranes, a coyote, and believe or not, two mules.  Of course, the mules were obviously domestic animals who escaped, but they managed to get away without their halters. I can only hope that they were caught soon enough.

Back at camp, we saw a giant bull elk hanging out.  He was injured, so he likely sought refuge in the relative safety of a campground – wolves and bears likely stay further away than the middle of camp.  He was eating and relaxing, and hopefully it was just a temporary injury.

Dinner that evening was spaghetti and meatballs with my aunt and uncle, and my sister-in-law’s mom, sister, niece and nephew.  Why do we not have better familial names for our in-laws’ families? I digress. We hung out around the campfire, and had birthday donuts in honor of my niece’s birthday.  What a fun day!

 

Distance for the Day: Driving within park
Canyon Campground, Yellowstone National Park: $30 per night for a tent site

Yellowstone Road Trip 2017: Mammoth Hot Springs

Day 6, Saturday, July 29, 2017

After spending quite a bit of time at the Lamar Valley watching all of the wildlife, coffee was in order, so we headed over to the Tower area to see Tower Falls.  There is a small Ranger Station there too that has its own stamp!  It also had a nice visual of the wolf packs in the park, so you can tell which pack you are watching.  Outside there was a beautiful deer just begging to be photographed!

Mule Deer in the Tower Area

Tower Fall has a 132 foot drop, where it then joins with the confluence of the Yellowstone River.  It was named in 1928 for the large rock formations at the top of the fall that look like towers.  There is an overlook, or you can hike down a half mile to the base of the falls.  We didn’t hike down to it, but it is certainly on the to-do list; the view looks like it is fantastic!  Tower Fall has a General Store too, perfect for a coffee pick-me-up after an early morning!

Tower Fall

Did you know that Yellowstone National Park has petrified wood?  It even has a petrified tree – still standing!  We stopped for a look; it is just a short walk from the parking area.  While there we also saw a Uinta Ground Squirrel!  These little guys are so cute!  We also saw a group trail riding on horseback – that would be a fun way to see the park sometime.

 

Petrified Wood at Yellowstone

 

Uinta Ground Squirrel

 

Trail Riders

 

We were ready for lunch by the time we hit the Fort Yellowstone picnic area.  More Uinta Ground Squirrels were popping up out of their burrows on the lawn!

Uinta Ground Squirrel

A visit to Mammoth Hot Springs and a walk on the raised boardwalk was next – I was glad to give this area a bit more attention since my mom and I hadn’t stopped here on our previous trip the year before.  I loved the travertine terraces – they are stunning!  They have been formed over thousands of years, as heated spring water carries calcium carbonate and deposits it as it cools.  The travertine is white, but the algae in the thermal water creates brown, orange, red and green features.

The kids enjoyed wandering on the boardwalks, but I think they got a little bored by the terraces; I didn’t though – the view was gorgeous!  My one niece was a little grumpy, so we started pointing out poop piles to her – because there are few more effective ways to annoy a pre-teen girl…  The kids were troopers though and we went all the way to the top of the lower terraces, despite the heat.

 

Violet-Green Swallows at Mammoth Hot Springs

 

Our drive back to camp took us south, where we stopped at Sheepeater Cliff – a columnar formation. It is really cool to see!

Sheepeater Cliff

 

Ground Squirrel at Sheepeater Cliff

We wandered a little bit along the river there too.  We saw people swimming in the Firehole River on the drive back too; this is one of the few river areas where you are permitted to swim.

We got back to camp and I took a nap in my tent during yet another rainstorm.  There is something very peaceful about the patter of raindrops on the rain fly as you sleep…  It didn’t last all night though, and we had a campfire after dinner – the family hung out and roasted marshmallows.  Perfect!

Distance for the Day: Driving within park
Canyon Campground, Yellowstone National Park: $30 per night for a tent site