Tag Archive | Arches National Park

Moab 2015: The Windows and Double Arch

After Delicate Arch, which are the most famous arches at Arches National Park?  The Windows!  And we had a chance to visit them!

The view of North Window from afar.

The view of North Window from afar.

After Broken Arch and Sand Dune Arch we decided to visit the arch trifecta in the park, the Windows section. Windows gives tourists a big bang for their buck, with four arches all visible from the parking area, or from close up if you walk a mere mile round trip from the parking lot. We started our hike on pavement, up some stairs to North Window. North Window is even with ground level here, so there was no shortage of people climbing around in it. That’s the drawback of the accessible arches.  There were lots of screaming children here too, so we took a few photos and headed on our way.

North Window Close Up

North Window Close Up

South Window is just past North Window, and is actually carved from the same sandstone fin. South Window is above the ground though, so I like the views here better because I could get a photo without the throngs of people that are standing and sitting in North Window.

South Window

South Window

South Window Close Up

South Window Close Up

Turret Arch is nearby – I think it looks like a keyhole – and there is a little unnamed arch right next to it. With a little bit of effort you can climb up into it, so I had Jon take my picture standing in the arch. Despite saying that he regretted not standing in Delicate Arch for a photo, he wouldn’t go up and stand in Turret Arch. Some things never change.

Turret Arch

Turret Arch

Somehow, I convinced Jon to go on the primitive trail back to the parking lot. I just had to explain there wouldn’t be people on it. And I wasn’t kidding – we walked around behind South Window and all the crowds vanished within 100 feet. We were all alone! I liked the photos from this angle best, as I was able to capture the sinking sun framed in North Window, and the people standing in it were small enough to not be obtrusive.

The sun setting through the South Window arch.

The sun setting through the South Window arch.

The primitive trail wasn’t anything too challenging, and a short hike saw us back in the parking lot. We had one more arch that I wanted to see, but I could tell that Jon’s energy was fading. He was a sport though, and let me do the trek down to Double Arch, which is off the same parking lot as the Windows.

Flowers near North Window

Flowers near North Window

Double Arch is two arches that are joined at one end, giving a very unique look when photographed from below. The hike is 0.5 miles roundtrip through some soft sand. Once we were there, I climbed up on the slick rock to get some better photos while Jon waited below. There were several young adults climbing under the arch, but I was able to get some photos with only a couple of people in them. All in all, I thought this arch was much more peaceful than the Windows.

Double Arch

Double Arch

We didn’t linger long because Jon was getting really tired and we were both hungry. We headed back into town and decided to go to Zak’s for dinner. Zak’s has steak and other eats, and we were able to get a table in the bar after only about 5 minutes (the wait in the restaurant was about 35 minutes, they said). The full menu is available in the bar, and it was a non-smoking place, so that was just fine with us!

The service was prompt and friendly – and we ordered beers – the Moab Brewery Dead Horse Ale for me, and the Squatter’s Brewery Hop Rising for Jon. We both ordered the Flat Iron Steak with asparagus, with rice for Jon and a baked potato for me. That really hit the spot! We were so hungry that I completely forgot to take any photos of our meal. Jon polished his off with a Uintas Brewery Hop Notch, and I drove us home for an early night…

What a fabulous, action packed day we had!

Moab 2015: Broken Arch and Sand Dune Arch

In my last post, Jon rocked his half marathon, we had a fabulous lunch in downtown Moab – but we were far from done for the day!

After lunch, we were eager to get out touristing, but obviously Jon wasn’t going to be up for a lot of hiking. I drove – and we headed to Arches. Since we were later coming into the park – it was about 1:30 pm – we found ourselves in a HUGE line at the park entrance… We waited a long time – probably about 45 minutes to get into the park. Fortunately for me, Jon was exhausted… too tired to complain about the wait. I did spend some time thinking it would be nice if they had a priority line for National Parks Passholders!

Eventually we made our way into the park, where I had picked out some easy hikes to some of the Arches we hadn’t seen yet (the ranger had given me some great ideas when I was at the Visitor’s Center that morning). We started at Broken Arch – named for the fact that there is a large vertical crack right in the middle of the arch. Broken Arch is 0.6 miles (1.2 miles round trip) of flat hiking through slightly soft sand, with views of the La Sal Mountains in the distance. Remarkably, when we got to Broken Arch, there was just one other family there, and they headed out shortly after we arrived. We were all alone, only 0.6 miles from the trail head!

The view from the Broken Arch trail head

The view from the Broken Arch trail head

Jon and me on our way to Broken Arch - Jon is rockin' his half-marathon shirt

Jon and me on our way to Broken Arch – Jon is rockin’ his half-marathon shirt

Broken Arch is one of the arches you can climb under, so I tried my luck at getting the proverbial “jumping photo.” Our timing wasn’t great though, because several attempts all caught me barely above the ground – you’ll just have to take my word for it that I’m able to jump super-high, while looking completely put together – HA! Sigh… We loved the quiet at Broken Arch, and sat on the rocks near the arch for a while, just enjoying the view and the solitude. But not for too long, because Jon didn’t want his muscles to stiffen up.

Broken Arch!

Broken Arch!

Me jumping at Broken Arch - I jumped really high - seriously...

Me jumping at Broken Arch – I jumped really high – seriously…

As we were getting ready to go, we ran into a young lady from Colorado trying for a selfie with the arch, so I offered to take her picture. We got to talking and she offered an interesting story. She had accompanied a friend who came to Moab to go on a group back-country uni-cycling tour. She came along to do some hiking while her friend was uni-cycling. I had no idea there were organized uni-cycling tours and back country no less!

Jon looking at the view of the LaSal Mountains from Broken Arch

Jon looking at the view of the LaSal Mountains from Broken Arch

This rock reminded me of a poodle - what do you see?

This rock reminded me of a poodle – what do you see?

On the way back from Broken Arch we took the short spur trail off to Sand Dune Arch. Sand Dune Arch is between two sandstone fins, and loose sand collects there making a fun experience for kids, who can play to their heart’s content in the red sand. And not so fun for this childless couple and my delicate ears – the sounds of kids yelling and shrieking echo loudly here!

A dead tree between the fins at Sand Dune Arch

A dead tree between the fins at Sand Dune Arch

Sand Dune Arch - which one of these kiddos won't make it?

Sand Dune Arch – which one of these kiddos won’t make it?

We hung out long enough to get some photos of Sand Dune Arch, with kids posing, jumping and back-flipping underneath. All only feet from the posted sign that says that Sand Dune Arch has experienced recent rock fall and you shouldn’t stand underneath. Either all those parents are illiterate, clueless, or hoping that the rock fall comes and takes out one of their brood – you decide!

People are stoo-pid...

People are stoo-pid…

 

Moab 2015: A Red Rock Half Marathon

Finally, Jon’s day had arrived – the Canyonlands Half Marathon! He had been looking forward to running a half marathon among the beautiful red rocks. The race is a point to point, beginning about 10 miles up Highway 128, along the Colorado River.

I dropped him off at 7:15 am to take one of the busses up to the start of the race. They close Highway 128 for the race, so there is no way for race participants to get a ride there except for via the busses. We said our goodbyes and I wished him luck, and went back to the hotel for breakfast.  I have my priorities.

Since there is not really anyplace where spectators can view the majority of the race due to the Highway 128 closure, this is really my story… I spent a leisurely morning, heading out to Arches National Park to see the exhibits in the Visitor’s Center.

Jon doesn’t always like to watch the movies that they have, so this time I sat down by myself in the theater and watched the whole thing. The Arches movie focuses on the geology of the park and the forces of nature that have created its arches over the last several million years. It also shows the process of erosion, and explains how arches are just a temporary feature, lasting only until erosion breaks them down.

Sedimentary Rock Types in Arches National Park - Arches NP Visitor's Center

Sedimentary Rock Types in Arches National Park – Arches NP Visitor’s Center

After the Visitor’s Center, I headed back into town, where I passed several of the 5 mile runners, and went to the rock shop just outside of town. This rock shop had everything. You could find all kinds of fossils, rocks, petrified wood and shell imaginable. I spent a while in there, just looking at everything. There was a gorgeous, huge fossilized dinosaur nest, with several intact eggs (not for sale), as well as a carved, stone skull that was beautiful.

For kids (or the young at heart) they distribute cards that entitle the holder to a free piece of dinosaur bone. To collect, you have to follow the dinosaur prints around the store to the shelf where you can choose your piece. I don’t doubt they are pieces of dinosaur bone, but I learned you have to know what you are looking for. There is no way that I would have guessed what I was holding wasn’t just another rock.

Soon enough, it was time to head into downtown and find a parking spot to go see the end of the race. I had enough time to watch and cheer for the runners for about 20 minutes before Jon came in with a time of 1:36:36. I was so pleased with him, especially since the race is at an elevation of over 4,000 feet, and we aren’t used to high altitude! He said it was the most difficult half marathon he has done, and he could totally feel the elevation.

Jon's Half Marathon Finish - 1 hour, 36 minutes, 36 seconds

Jon’s Half Marathon Finish – 1 hour, 36 minutes, 36 seconds

We got him hydrated and then headed back to the hotel so he could take a shower. And then we were off to get lunch! We decided to go to the Twisted Sistas’ Café, a place I had seen reviews for on TripAdvisor. We got there just before it started filling up, and ordered. I ordered the Jamon Serrano Wrapped Shrimp Salad, with chopped romaine tossed with tomato, Kalamata olives and parmesan in a creamy lemon dill dressing, topped with baked shrimp wrapped in jamon serrano.

The most amazing salad!

The most amazing salad!

Jon had the Grilled Turkey and Smoked Cheddar Wrap – Grilled roasted turkey breast, bacon and melted smoked cheddar on a warmed garlic-herb tortilla wrap with lettuce, tomato, onion and avocado, drizzled with a smoked paprika aioli.

Both meals were fantastic, but my salad knocked my socks off! The tangy dressing with the salty jamon serrano wrapped around big shrimp. It was so delicious – I will certainly go back again for that meal!

Moab 2015: We Made It!

It was time!  To make our way to Moab that is!  We couldn’t wait to get back there after so thoroughly enjoying our time there last year.

We stopped south of Salt Lake City for a quick lunch and some snacks, and then got on the road for the trip down US Highway 6. Highway 6 is the main highway between Salt Lake City and Moab, and used to be a main thoroughfare between the Midwest and California, until it was bypassed by I-70. It is a very winding highway that is often only one lane in each direction, with passing lanes at regular intervals.

It winds through the city of Price, Utah, a mining town that might be fun to pass a day in. Price has a mining museum and some dinosaur attractions, commemorating the fact that many dinosaur fossils have been found throughout the area. That said, Price seems like a town that time forgot, at least the sections visible from the highway. Lots of run down homes and empty buildings.

Further south from Price, Highway 6 also passes by the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry, which is still being quarried for fossils today (that would be cool to visit). I hadn’t heard of it before, so did a little research on it later.

It was an uneventful drive – we did end up seeing 3 pronghorn and 3 prairie dogs (no photos as we blazed by at 65 mph)… one day I will get a good photo of pronghorn in the wild.

We ended up in Moab right about 4 pm, got checked into our hotel room and immediately changed into hiking clothes. We were at Arches National Park at 4:20! We stopped at the first trail head in the park, the Park Avenue hike – an easy 2 mile out and back through a wash beneath gorgeous sandstone formations.

Jon taking in Park Avenue.

Jon taking in Park Avenue.

The Park Service has Park Avenue listed as a moderate hike, but that is really only because it has a set of stone stairs at the beginning of the hike. If you started the hike from the second trail head, you could do almost the whole hike without the stairs. Much of the hike is in shade, which made it relatively cool (I was wearing shorts and had to put on a fleece).

Sheep Rock, from our Park Avenue hike.

Sheep Rock, from our Park Avenue hike.

After our Park Avenue hike, we drove down to the Balanced Rock viewpoint. Balanced Rock is one of the most recognized features in the park, and it is an easy walk on a paved sidewalk (total round-trip distance 0.3 miles).

I can't get enough of this view!

I can’t get enough of this view!

I asked Jon to try to take a picture of me “holding up” Balanced Rock, like they do with the Leaning Tower of Pisa, but he was not up to the challenge. He took the camera, looked at the viewfinder for a second, snapped a pic, and said “here, that’s as good as it’s going to get.” This was the result…

Me

Me “holding up” Balanced Rock. Ignore my totally pasty, white legs – I’m from the Northwest…

This is what I need girlfriends for – they are way more accommodating to my foolishness…

Balanced Rock at Arches National Park

Balanced Rock at Arches National Park

Balanced Rock was great, but it was dinnertime, and we wanted to make sure to get a place at the Moab Brewery, so we headed back into town. The brewery wasn’t nearly as packed as it was last time for some reason, so we were able to snag a table right away in the bar.

Jon ordered the Black Imperial IPA that he had last time we were there, and our server told him that the latest batch was hit or miss, due to some weird, unknown problem during bottling. He said that Jon was welcome to try one and give it back if it wasn’t good.

We appreciated his honesty and the commitment to a quality product, so Jon ordered a Hopped Rye beer instead and a veggie burrito. He loved both. I had the Dead Horse Amber, which was sold out last time we were there, with a Reuben sandwich, both delicious. We enjoyed our beers, and both had seconds, with Jon ordering another Hopped Rye and me getting a Hefeweizen.

Jon's Veggie Burrito

Jon’s Veggie Burrito

After the brewery, we headed back to the hotel for a relaxing evening.  We had a full day of adventuring coming up, including zip lining!

Moab 2015: A Trip is Born

Jon is a masterful schemer. He always manages to get me to agree to a trip to someplace he wants to go and this time was no exception. How? One strategy is to find a race in the destination he wants to visit. In December 2013, it was the Sacramento marathon. In March 2015, we made a return trip to Moab, Utah, for a high elevation half marathon.

Of course, I wouldn’t be so willing to oblige if the locations were less desirable, but given that Moab is home to both Arches and Canyonlands National Parks, and I loved our short time there in April 2014, of course you know my reaction to his proposal! I began to plot our course – we would fly into Salt Lake City, then drive down to Moab (just under a 4 hour drive).

The pieces began to fall together. I knew I wanted to visit Antelope Island, just north of Salt Lake City. I have been dreaming about Antelope Island since reading a fellow blogger’s posts about it, and had it on my list when Jon and I were considering driving from Washington on our Southwest adventure during the spring of 2014. When we made the decision to fly instead of drive, going out of our way to Salt Lake City was one of the things we had to cut (so many places, so little time!).

I also have read a couple of books lately about the mainstream Mormon faith and its polygamist offshoots, so checking out the historic Mormon sites in downtown Salt Lake City went on the list.

And Jon had been drooling over the idea of a zip line adventure when we were in Moab a year ago, so I asked him if it was still on his bucket list. Of course it was – what a stupid question! I, being terrified of heights, wasn’t sure I would be brave enough, but after researching the zip line company, watching the videos, and reading all the Trip Advisor reviews, plus conducting a Facebook poll of my friends, decided that I would give it a try. When your aunt, who is in her early 70s, says you should go for it, you can’t very well chicken out, right?

Salt Lake City to Moab

Salt Lake City to Moab

With all that, I vowed to fill our free time with hikes in the parks, trying to fill in the gaps of what we didn’t see a year ago, and cheering Jon on at the finish line of his race. A trip was born!

 

SW National Parks Trip: A Last Bit of Arches

When we got back to the car after hiking to Landscape Arch, we began making our way back to the park’s entrance so we could get on the road.  Arches does not have a through road, so you drive several miles out to see what you want to see, and then turn around and drive back the way you came.  This gave us an opportunity to stop at some of the viewpoints and see a bit more of Arches from the road, before we headed on our way.

Arches National Park in Bloom – the red blooms are Indian Paintbrush

Arches National Park in Bloom – the red blooms are Indian Paintbrush

We stopped at the Salt Valley Overlook, a viewpoint that lets you see the diversity in the geology of the park and the beautiful La Sal Mountains in the distance.  This land used to be an enormous sea, so below all the sandstone is a layer of salt, hundreds of feet thick in places.

The view from the Salt Valley Overlook – Arches National Park

The view from the Salt Valley Overlook – Arches National Park

We saw Balanced Rock, which is a column of Navajo Sandstone with a 55 foot tall rock precariously perched on top.  It used to have a companion, aptly named Chip Off the Old Block, but Chip fell during the winter of 1975/1976.  Another reminder that the landscape is constantly changing, even if it seems to do it very slowly.

Balanced Rock at Arches National Park

Balanced Rock at Arches National Park

Our last stop was at the Courthouse Towers Viewpoint, close to the Visitor’s Center.  We saw Sheep Rock (it really does look like a sheep) and the Three Gossips.  I think Eagle Rock is a more fitting name for this one – because I thought the rock on the right looked like an eagle.  Do you agree?  We also spied Baby Arch, one of the smallest arches in the park.  Maybe one day, thousands of years from now, it will be much larger.  An arch has to be at least three feet to be considered an arch, but I’m sure Baby Arch is actually much larger than that.

Sheep Rock at Arches National Park

Sheep Rock at Arches National Park

The Three Gossips at Arches NP – I think it should be called Eagle Rock

The Three Gossips at Arches NP – I think it should be called Eagle Rock

After we left Arches, we headed down the road to our next destination – Cortez, Colorado. We made the two hour drive in good time, moving from the mesa and rock formations to a mountain forest pass, and then eventually farmland. Cortez is a small town of about 8,400 people at an elevation of 7,000 feet. We checked into our hotel (can you believe it was a Super 8?) and changed our clothes, and tried to wash a bit of the grit off our faces from our earlier sand facewashes.  Then we headed for a walk down Main Street to find some food.  Just an aside: after growing up in a town with no Main Street, I love it when small towns have one!  Jon was in a beer mood again, so we went to the Main Street Brewery (fitting name right?).

It wasn’t very busy the evening that we were there, and the service was fast and friendly.  They brought us samples of a few of the beers to help us make a decision, and Jon selected their IPA.  I went with the Honey Raspberry Wheat beer, which has local honey added during the brewing process and raspberries added during the finishing.  It is a light beer that wasn’t too sweet.  Perfect!

Beer Samples come in a fancy glass here

Beer Samples come in a fancy glass here

For food I ordered the Nutty Blue Salad, which had dried cranberries, candied walnuts and blue cheese crumbles on a bed of romaine lettuce.  And it was topped with medium rare Angus steak strips.  Delicious!  Jon had the Rocky Mountain Trout, with rice pilaf and seasonal vegetables (zucchini, mushrooms and onions).  He also enjoyed a second beer – their Schnorzenboomer Amber Dopplebock – say that 3 times fast!  It was a deep amber beer with lots of malty flavors.

My Nutty Blue Salad – dried cranberries, candied walnuts, blue cheese crumbles and Angus steak strips

My Nutty Blue Salad – dried cranberries, candied walnuts, blue cheese crumbles and Angus steak strips

After a very enjoyable meal, we strolled back to the hotel to call it a night – we had Mesa Verde National Park to look forward to in the morning!

 

SW National Parks Trip: Landscape Arch at Arches NP

After Delicate Arch, we went up to another trail head to take a short hike – 1.6 miles round trip – to Landscape Arch. The hike takes you past several fins, which are the intermediate rock formations between a slab of rock and an arch. The stone begins as a solid slab of sandstone, and then over time cracks form in the block of stone. Water erodes the rocks, eventually forming fins and arches. The last stage in the process is when the arch collapses. Of course, this process takes millions of years, but since 1970, 43 arches in Arches National Park have collapsed.

Fins of Sandstone - Which one do you think will become an Arch?

Fins of Sandstone – Which one do you think will become an Arch?

Landscape Arch is the longest arch in the park – but very fragile.  In fact, it is thought to be the longest arch in the world; measuring 290.1 feet in 2004.  In 1991, after several days of unseasonably heavy rains, a large piece of rock, approximately 60 feet long, fell from Landscape Arch and landed below. No one was injured or killed, but the Park Service closed the trail below to prevent the potential for future incidents.  Landscape Arch could last another million years, but it could come crashing down at any time.

Landscape Arch is on the Devil’s Garden Trail, which is the longest maintained trail in the park.  It is 7.2 miles round trip, and it passes by eight named arches, with many more visible in the distance.  If you want, you can hike past Landscape Arch and do a loop on a primitive trail past several more arches.

We set out on a paved path that goes up and down some hills along the way.  At the very beginning, you are sheltered from the wind, but early in the hike you step into an area that acts as a wind tunnel if there is any sort of breeze.  Unfortunately for us, this area also has quite a bit of loose sand.  The wind was really blowing the day we were there, so we both got sandblasting face washes at a couple of points.  To add further insult to injury, we both had our hats blown off a couple of times. I guess this is why hikers wear those hats with the chinstrap strings.

Jon hits the Devil’s Garden Trail – always walking ahead…

Jon hits the Devil’s Garden Trail – always walking ahead…

A little further up the trail, you reach a fork in the trail that will take you to Tunnel Arch and Pine Tree Arch.  I would have liked to have taken the detour, but we weren’t sure how far away they were and we were already going to be hiking almost five miles for the day as it was.  Next time, I will definitely go see them though!

The view from the Devil’s Garden Trail

The view from the Devil’s Garden Trail

As you get closer to Landscape Arch, the trail turns to soft sand; it made for more difficult hiking for the last little bit.  And the loose sand kicked up quite a bit in the wind too.  But when we got to the viewpoint, I was impressed with the Arch.

Landscape Arch – The World’s Longest Natural Arch

Landscape Arch – The World’s Longest Natural Arch

We also saw Partition Arch which is right next to Landscape Arch, and spent a little while just taking in the view.  Even though you can no longer hike up underneath Landscape Arch, it is still really impressive.  And knowing that in my lifetime, I will never see an arch that is longer than this one… well, that’s pretty neat too.

Partition Arch – the one next door to Landscape Arch

Partition Arch – the one next door to Landscape Arch

Have you ever hiked to Landscape Arch?  Did you see the other arches on the trail?