San Diego 2016: Cabrillo NM


Day 1: April 23, 2016

My trip to San Diego began early, with a 5:00 am flight, but fortunately, I didn’t get the in-depth groping from the TSA agent that my girlfriend received. Something about the waistband of her pants made her seem like a terrorist, so she got more action than a prostitute in a lumber camp… I jest, but they really did give her the once over (more like twice or thrice over!), and she was not happy. It all seemed like a bit much for 3:45 in the morning…  What we do for the love of travel…

Our two flights were non-eventful, and we got to San Diego at about 9:30 in the morning, where we waited for ages for our rental car! It was easily the most banged up rental car I’ve ever seen!  I wasn’t going to have to worry about a scratch that we put on it! I put X’s and O’s all over the little diagram where it asks you to document any existing damage and took pictures of the car with my phone, and then we were on our way.

We checked into our hotel, but our room wasn’t ready yet so we changed into shorts, stashed our luggage with the bellman and made our way to Cabrillo National Monument!

Me! I loved this sign with its ship!

Me! I loved this sign with its ship!

Cabrillo National Monument commemorates the first exploration of San Diego Bay and the West Coast by Europeans: Spaniard Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo.  Cabrillo had been a part of the group of Spanish conquistadors that landed in Mexico and wiped out the Aztecs.  After that Cabrillo settled in Guatemala, where he was given vast land holdings, but his spirit of adventure caught up with him and he was selected for a mission to explore the West Coast.

Oh that view! Cabrillo National Monument

Oh that view! Cabrillo National Monument

The three ships in Cabrillo’s expedition landed at San Diego Bay on September 28, 1542, likely at the spot known as Ballast Point (the Ballast Point brewery is named after this spot, and their Grapefruit Sculpin is excellent by the way…).  They declared it an excellent port, and Cabrillo named is San Miguel.  The name was changed to San Diego about 60 years later.  Cabrillo continued north to Monterey Bay, and it is speculated that he got as far north as Point Reyes before bad weather forced a turn back south.  The expedition wintered in the Channel Islands, where Cabrillo died on January 3, 1543, after a scuffle with the local Native Americans caused him to fall and shatter a limb.

A view of the water at Cabrillo National Monument

A view of the water at Cabrillo National Monument.

 

A Pelican flying at Cabrillo National Monument

A Pelican flying at Cabrillo National Monument.

The monument was designated by a proclamation signed by Woodrow Wilson in 1913; the original purpose was both to commemorate Cabrillo’s landing and to protect the Old Point Loma Lighthouse, which was constructed in 1855.  Approximately 877,951 visitors come here each year.

Old Point Loma Lighthouse - Built 1855 - Third Order Fresnel Lens

Old Point Loma Lighthouse – Built 1855 – Third Order Fresnel Lens

The Old Point Loma Lighthouse was first lit on November 15, 1855, and guided sailors into San Diego Bay for 36 years from its perch 422 feet above sea level.  But on March 23, 1891, the third order Fresnel lens was extinguished for the last time, and a new light took over, built closer to sea level.  The problem with the Old Point Loma Light was that they hadn’t realized when building it that the heavy fog in San Diego often obscured that light that far from sea level.  Oops…  But the lighthouse remains, and it is now open to the public.  I went into the Lighthouse and saw the restored keeper’s quarters and various rooms, and was able to peek into the tower from below.  I have heard that they open up the tower one day a year to the public for visits, but otherwise it is protected by a metal grate.

The Third Order Fresnel lens in the Old Point Loma Lighthouse

The Third Order Fresnel lens in the Old Point Loma Lighthouse.

Cabrillo National Monument also has one of the best vantage points in the country for watching the annual Pacific Gray Whale migration; not far from the Lighthouse is a whale watching area where visitors flock in the winter.  We were there too late to see the whales, but we were able to see the Coronado Islands in Mexico off in the distance.  The view was spectacular!

The statue of Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo

The statue of Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo.

Not far from the Lighthouse is a large statue of Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo; it was placed there in 1988 after the original 1949 statue began to deteriorate from so many years of being exposed to the elements.  The statue was a popular place, with lots of tourists posing with it, or having their picture taken with the bay in the background.  My friends made a friend, a ground squirrel was clearly accustomed to being fed by the tourists.  We didn’t give in to his begging.

The very friendly ground squirrel who was looking for his next handout...

The very friendly ground squirrel who was looking for his next handout…

 

A cute lizard sunning himself near the Cabrillo NM Visitor's Center

A cute lizard sunning himself near the Cabrillo NM Visitor’s Center.

We took the path down closer to the water and watched the waves crash against the rocks.  Geologically, the rocks are formed from sandstone, shale and siltstone; they contain fossils of ocean dwelling mollusks, and dinosaur fossils have been found here as well.  It was neat to see how the ocean has carved these cliffs into very interesting patterns.  Visitors can also go further down and explore the tide pools and check out the creatures that inhabit them.

The waves have carved these rocks into some interesting shapes

The waves have carved these rocks into some interesting shapes.

 

Girlfriend selfie! Allysa is wearing the tiara for her birthday, more on that in an upcoming post.

Girlfriend selfie! Allysa is wearing the tiara for her birthday, more on that in an upcoming post.

On the way out, we got a view of the Rosecrans National Cemetery, with its perfectly straight rows of graves.  There is something so peaceful about cemeteries, I loved seeing this one in its perch high above the water.

Rosecrans National Cemetery, overlooking San Diego Bay

Rosecrans National Cemetery, overlooking San Diego Bay.

Cabrillo National Monument was a worthwhile afternoon outing – I loved it!

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7 thoughts on “San Diego 2016: Cabrillo NM

  1. I’m sorry to hear about the over zealous TSA agents and I’m glad that did not negatively effect your trip too much, I would very much love to visit San Diego myself and have considered it for a family vacation destination for some time, the sheer amount of amazing wildlife you were able to sample has only reinforced this desire. The pictures you have taken are simply stunning and I honestly had no idea the wealth of history on offer in the local area, what an amazing trip.

    • The TSA folks didn’t put too much of a damper on things. It is just the inconvenience of traveling anymore. We had a great time. I have a girlfriend with a young son and she loves taking him to San Diego, there are lots of things to do for those with children as well. I haven’t finished the blog posts for the trip either; I hope you will check back in for more!

  2. Pingback: Wine and History Visited

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