Colorado 2015: RMNP – The Trail Ridge Road


Day 2: August 2, 2015

Rocky Mountain National Park is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year! And we had the opportunity to visit! We got on our way in the morning, and made our way to the park, which is just a couple of miles outside of Estes Park. The Visitor’s Centers here are outside of the entrance stations, which threw me off a bit, and sadly I didn’t see it when we passed by! By the time I realized our mistake, we were already in the park, and partway up the mountain, so we opted not to turn around and go back. I knew there were more Visitor’s Centers later on…

Rocky Mountain National Park's 100th Anniversary!

Rocky Mountain National Park’s 100th Anniversary!

We drove the Trail Ridge Road, and stopped at several viewpoints and saw the beautiful coniferous forests, the gorgeous meadows and the distant mountains. We were also able to see the destruction caused by the Mountain Pine Beetle. Although this beetle has always been part of the ecosystem, drought conditions over the last several years have allowed the beetle to gain a much larger foothold, and the current infestation is 10 times worse that what has been seen previously.

Forest and meadow at Rocky Mountain National Park

Forest and meadow at Rocky Mountain National Park

This Clark's Nutcracker spent awhile posing for me.

This Clark’s Nutcracker spent awhile posing for me.

Jon taking in the view at Rocky Mountain National Park

Jon taking in the view at Rocky Mountain National Park

We gradually increased in elevation, stopping at various viewpoints to see the changes in the landscape, until we reached the tundra habitat at the park. It was interesting to see the rocks and vegetation that exist above the tree line.  Jon and I did a short hike on a path through the tundra, and were able to check out some neat rock formations.

Trail Ridge Road heading up through the tundra

Trail Ridge Road heading up through the tundra

The beautiful tundra view at 11,000 feet

The beautiful tundra view at 11,000 feet

We saw elk from the car, but we weren’t able to get pictures because they were perched high up on a hill where there wasn’t really a pull-out. I was a little disappointed about that, but I have other photos of elk… I felt much better when we got back from our hike to find two Yellow-bellied Marmots right near our car! They were right off the road; one was licking the dirt beneath the gravel at the side of the road – I assume to get salt.  I got a ton of photos, because one of them posed perfectly for me!

This little guy just posed for us!

This little guy just posed for us!

I loved this little guy - he was so photogenic

I loved this little guy – he was so photogenic

We also stopped at a high-altitude viewpoint to find several people with binoculars looking out across the field. I asked one of them what they were looking at – Bighorn Sheep! We had our binoculars, so we looked and were able to see two sheep lying down really far away next to a snow patch. No pictures possible at that distance, but it was a great experience!

See that big snow patch on the right? Well, to the right of it, about halfway down, were two bighorn sheep. You are just going to have to take my word for it.

See that big snow patch on the right? Well, to the right of it, about halfway down, were two bighorn sheep. You are just going to have to take my word for it.

We stopped at the Alpine Visitor’s Center, located above 11,000 feet in elevation. I was able to get my stamp! And some postcards of course. We ate our lunch in the blustery wind outside to the Visitor’s Center – and checked out the views all around. There is a short nature trail up to the top of a nearby peak, so Jon and I challenged ourselves to do it; especially because one of the rangers had said there were elk up there! Hiking is hard at such a high altitude! After huffing and puffing my way to the top, it was a big letdown to discover there were no elk in sight. BOO!

Jon and me at Rocky Mountain National Park!

Jon and me at Rocky Mountain National Park!

I didn’t have long to be disappointed about the elk though, because it was threatening to rain!  We made our way back to the car and continued on our way.

Have you driven the Trail Ridge Road at Rocky Mountain National Park?

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10 thoughts on “Colorado 2015: RMNP – The Trail Ridge Road

  1. Pingback: Colorado 2015: RMNP – Holzwarth Historic Site | Wine and History Visited

  2. It’s been a long time since I’ve done Trail Ridge Road. The past few times I’ve made it to RMNP, it’s either been too early or too late in the season and the road is closed. It’s a beautiful trip from what I remember.

  3. Very cool! We’ve heard great things about RMNP, but unfortunately the Ridge Road was still closed when we left Wyoming this part spring and decided to put it off for another time. The 100th anniversary does seem like a great time to visit!

    • It was awesome! Although I think there are still several hikes and things to see even when the Trail Ridge Road is closed. I would have loved to have more time there. We will certainly go back.

  4. Pingback: Colorado 2015: Highlights and Stats | Wine and History Visited

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